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I wasn’t sure where to place the lone chardonnay in my wine and food pairing dinner. It was to be accompanied by mushroom flan. Being the fabulous hostess that I am I knew my guests tastes and decided to make my own mushroom course to pair with Aquinas 2010 Chardonnay. Mushroom flan does sound interesting to me and I would like to try it if given the opportunity, but I knew that wouldn’t be favored by the majority of my dinner party participants. The mushroom flan recipe called for porcini mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms, and yukon gold potatoes. Those sounded like a delicious combination so I started there when planning my mushroom course.

Mushroom Mashed Potatoes seemed the logical replacement, but I didn’t feel that was enough. My mushroom course became: Mushroom Mashed Potatoes with Chives, Portobello Fries, and Sauteed Mushroom Puffs. I am so proud of this course because it was completely my invention and everyone loved it! Even my friends that aren’t mushroom lovers are slowly being converted. Mashed potatoes are already one of the most delicious foods on earth. Add in shiitake, portobello, oyster, and button mushrooms with just a splash of truffle oil and you have a creamy buttery mushroomy plate of deliciousness.

The portobello fries were a fun addition to this course and added texture with the crunchy and light tempura batter. For more of a flavor kick I added cayenne pepper to the tempura batter before coating the thick-sliced portobellos. The third section of this course was the Sauteed Mushroom Puffs. I once had a mushroom appetizer in a fancy restaurant. It was just a square of puff pastry topped with sauteed mushrooms and drizzled with béchamel sauce. It is one of those flavor memories that I have never forgotten and always wanted to try to recreate. I finally did recreate it and it was scrumptious!

The wine that was paired with this course was the Don and Sons Aquinas Chardonnay. This was not the favorite of the evening. It was described as “light and soft” by Jenn, but didn’t receive high praise by anyone else. Can you tell we aren’t white wine drinkers? If you are just beginning your venture into the world of wine, then this might be a good white to begin with. It is sweet, flowery and orangey. The pairing of this wine with the mushrooms wasn’t exactly a hit, but the wine on it’s own was fine. I am so proud to say that the mushrooms were the real stars of this course.

This is not a sponsored post. I received these wines for free, but I am not being compensated for using them or writing about them. I am not affiliated with Don & Sons or Balzac Communications. All opinions expressed on Daisy At Home are my own and were not formed by any person, company, or being other than my own tastebuds and brain.

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